US Army Corps of Engineers
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Archive: 2017
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  • CRSO EIS - Public Update Sessions

    An update session on developing the draft Environmental Impact Statement
  • Releases from Gavins Point Dam reduced to winter rate

    Gavins Point Dam releases began the reduction to the winter release rate of 21,500 cubic feet per second (cfs) on December 4. “Based on the September 1 system storage, Gavins Point Dam winter releases will be at least 17,000 cfs. However, higher-than-normal runoff during the late summer and fall will allow us to provide a slightly higher release during the winter months. Higher winter releases will provide additional hydropower generation during the winter, which is one of the peak power demand periods. It will also benefit municipal and industrial water intakes below Gavins Point Dam, which can be impacted by low water levels during periods of ice formation,” said John Remus, chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) Missouri River Basin Water Management Division. Gavins Point Dam winter releases normally range between 12,000 and 17,000 cfs.
  • Releases from Gavins Point Dam to be reduced to winter release rate in late November

    Gavins Point Dam releases will remain near 31,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) for the first half of November and then increased to 32,000 cfs. Releases will be held at that rate until late November and then stepped down approximately 3,000 cfs each day until they reach the winter release rate. “Based on the September 1 system storage, Gavins Point Dam winter releases will be at least 17,000 cubic feet per second (cfs). However, higher than normal runoff during the late summer and fall will allow us to provide a slightly higher release during the late fall and winter months. Higher winter releases will provide additional hydropower generation during the winter, one of the peak power demand periods. It will also benefit municipal and industrial water intakes below Gavins Point Dam, which can be impacted by low water levels during periods of ice formation,” said John Remus, chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Missouri River Basin Water Management Division. Gavins Point Dam winter releases normally range between 12,000 and 17,000 cfs.
  • Missouri River Recovery Implementation Committee enters new phase

    The Missouri River Recovery Implementation Committee (MRRIC) met in Kansas City, Missouri, Oct. 30-Nov. 2. Committee members continued their work on the transition to an adaptive management framework that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will use to help protect the pallid sturgeon, the interior least tern, and the piping plover while maintaining the Missouri River’s eight authorized purposes (flood control, navigation, irrigation, hydropower, water supply, water quality, recreation, and fish and wildlife).
  • Tribes work with MRRIC as committee enters new phase

    The Missouri River Recovery Implementation Committee (MRRIC) met in Kansas City, Missouri, Oct. 30-Nov. 2. Tribes were represented by Dr. Kelly Morgan, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe; Randy Teboe, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska; John Fox, Osage Nation; Richard White, Ogalala Sioux Tribe, and Elizabeth Wakeman, Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe. The Omaha Tribe has joined the MRRIC Committee, appointing Orville Cayou, Vice-Chairman for the Tribe (who attended this meeting), and Jessica Webster-Valentino, Tribal Treasurer.
  • Gavins Point releases reduced to lessen downstream flooding; public meetings set for mid-October

    Gavins Point releases were reduced from 31,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) to 26,000 cfs to lessen downstream flooding. Heavy rainfall in the lower Missouri Basin resulted in increased tributary flows below the Missouri River Mainstem Reservoir System (System). Gavins Point releases will be increased back to 31,000 cfs as downstream flows recede. Fort Randall releases were reduced to as low as 19,500 cfs to limit the rise of the Gavins Point reservoir level, which was impacted by high runoff from localized rain and reduced releases.