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  • Pacific lamprey returns eclipsing other years

    *Our initial news release referenced adult Pacific Lamprey returns were 170 percent higher than the 10-year-average and then referenced the 10-year-average being 41,414 which is actually closer to 154 percent. The 170 percent number came from using the 2022 Annual Fish Passage Report, which references completed counts over ten years from 2013-2022. This average is 37,425. This has been updated online and addressed in other forums. Please excuse this mistake. Adult returns are indeed 252 percent higher than the four-year-average. Also, note these counts are daytime counts and lamprey passage numbers are still probably closer to 165,314 total fish. Pacific lamprey, an ancient, eel-like fish species, are seeing returns 170 percent higher than the 10-year average (2013-2022) at Bonneville Lock and Dam this year. Lamprey numbers are also 252 percent higher than the four-year average, according to biologists responsible for reporting the number of fish counted as they migrate upstream past mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams.
  • Federal water managers announce public information sessions about post-September 2024 Columbia River Treaty operations

    How the United States uses reservoir space in Canada changes on September 16, 2024, from the high degree of structure and control of flows coming across the border from Canada experienced over the last 60 years under the Columbia River Treaty, to an operation that increases the uncertainty of those flows. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) will hold four virtual public information sessions in September and October to begin informing the public about the potential changes.
  • Drastic difference between air and water temperature could kill

    With the onset of record-breaking heat across much of the Pacific Northwest, it’s imperative that people wear life jackets while swimming, boating and fishing. While air temperatures may be high, water temperatures can be much lower and can be deadly, according to water safety statistics.
  • Water managers begin spring spill to benefit juvenile salmon

    Federal water managers will begin spilling hundreds of thousands of gallons of water over spillways instead of through turbines during annual “spring spill” operations at U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ dams on the lower Snake and Columbia rivers.
  • Frigid temps increase power demand while Army dams balance needs

    With frigid temperatures and near record-setting snow accumulation in some areas of the Pacific Northwest, Army dams responded by producing power to keep the lights and heat on. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has 21 dams in the Columbia and Willamette river basins that ramp up power production to keep the grid stable during high demands.
  • Corps begins spring fish operations

    Portland, Ore. — On April 3, the U.S. Army Corps ofEngineers (Corps) began implementing its 2016