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  • June’s improved runoff not enough for Missouri River basin drought

    Despite improved runoff in June, water conservation measures will continue for the second half of the navigation flow support season based on the July 1 Missouri River Mainstem Reservoir System storage.
  • Below average runoff forecasts for upper Missouri River Basin continue

    Runoff continues to be below average in the upper Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa. Below-normal precipitation, dry soil conditions in the western portions of the basin, and cooler-than-normal temperatures slowing mountain snowmelt, resulted in a May runoff of 2.7 million acre-feet. While this was 0.4 MAF more than forecast last month, this volume is still 79% of average.
  • Drought conditions persist throughout the Missouri River Basin

    Dry conditions in April resulted in well-below average runoff in the upper Missouri River Basin. April runoff was 1.5 million acre-feet, which is 51% of average. The updated 2022 upper Basin runoff forecast is 17.8 MAF, 69% of average, which, if realized, would rank as the 23rd lowest calendar year runoff volume.
  • Upper Missouri River basin forecast runoff remains well below normal; water conservation measures continue

    Reservoir inflows in the Missouri River basin above Sioux City, Iowa, were well-below average in March. The March runoff of 1.5 million acre-feet (MAF) was 48% of average for the month. The updated 2022 upper Basin runoff forecast is 17.8 MAF, 69% of average, approximately 2.6 MAF less than the March 1 forecast. 
  • Schedule for Missouri River spring public meetings set

    Spring public meetings to discuss Missouri River Water Management operations and plans are scheduled for April 11-15. Spring public meetings provide a status of mountain snowpack, a runoff forecast for the year, and how operations during the runoff year will meet the authorized purposes for the Missouri River Mainstem System.
  • Below average runoff continues for the upper Missouri River Basin

    “The runoff in February was less than predicted, and we expect the lower-than-average runoff to continue in the coming months,” said John Remus, chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’, Missouri River Basin Water Management Division. “The snow accumulation in both the plains and the mountains continues to be below average, and the soil moisture remains very low compared to normal. This resulted in us lowering our anticipated runoff for the 2022 water year.”